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CINCH - Health Economics Research Center

Virtual Essen Health Economics Seminar

26.01.2021

On Monday, February 1 2021, 16:00 - 17:30, Eduardo Costa (Nova School of Business and Economics) will present:

License to Kill? The Impact of Hospital Strikes

Hospital strikes in the Portuguese National Health Service (NHS) are becoming increasingly frequent. This paper analyses the effect of different health professionals' strikes (physicians, nurses and diagnostic and therapeutic technicians - DTT) on patients’ outcomes and hospital activity. Patient-level data, comprising all NHS hospital admissions in mainland Portugal from 2012 to 2018, is used together with a comprehensive strike dataset with almost 130 protests. Pooled OLS is employed to study the impact of strikes on health outcomes. A Hazard model is also used to analyze changes in patients' length of stay. Data suggests that hospital operations are partially disrupted during strikes, with sharp reductions in surgical admissions (up to 54%) and a decline on both inpatient and outpatient care admissions. Controlling for hospital characteristics, time and regional patterns, and differences in patients’ composition, results suggest a 6% increase in hospital mortality for patients exposed to physicians’ strikes. Urgent readmissions increase for patients exposed to nurses or DTTs' strikes. Results suggest that legal minimum staffing levels defined during strikes, particularly during physicians' strikes, fail to prevent declines in the quality of care provided.

Room: Due to the current situation regarding the COVID-19 pandemic, the talk will be held in a virtual seminar room. For more information click here.


Virtual Essen Health Economics Seminar

19.01.2021

On Monday, January 25 2021, 16:00 - 17:30, Miriam Wüst (University of Copenhagen) will present:

Nurses and Parental Health Investments

Timely adherence with vaccination schedules and preventive health checks for infants can help avoid costs to the health care system and support population health. Can public health interventions--such as universal home visits--encourage timely parental uptake of vaccinations and health checks? We study this question in the context of nurse home visits for new parents in Denmark. Using merged nurse records and administrative data, we exploit variation in the timing of nurse visits around the recommended age for vaccinations and preventive health checks at the GP in an event study design: we compare the outcomes of treated and control families, i.e. families with a nurse visit prior to or shortly after the recommended age. While treated parents are more likely than control parents to delay the first GP health check, we find that a timely nurse visit increases the probability of timely vaccination adherence. In the longer-run treated parents are not more likely than control parents to adhere with vaccinations, but they appear to be more likely to adhere timely. These findings suggest that nurses act as human reminders and impact parental beliefs about the importance of the timing of health investments.  Thus policy makers should consider the timing of early interventions such as contacts to primary health care providers for new families to support the central goal of achieving timely population-wide vaccination coverage.

Room: Due to the current situation regarding the COVID-19 pandemic, the talk will be held in a virtual seminar room. For more information click here.


Virtual Essen Health Economics Seminar

14.01.2021

On Monday, January 18 2021, 8:00 - 9:30, Stefanie Schurer (University of Sydney) will present:

Unintended Consequences of Welfare Reform: Evidence from Birth Outcomes of Aboriginal Australians

In 2007, Australia introduced its most radical welfare reform in recent history, targeting Aboriginal communities with the aim of addressing the intergenerational transmission of disadvantage. The ‘income management’ policy forces Aboriginal welfare recipients to spend at least half of their government transfers on essentials (e.g. food, housing). We estimate the policy’s impact on birth outcomes by exploiting its staggered rollout. Our estimates suggest that exposure to income management reduced average birthweight by 95 grams and increased the probability of low birthweight by 3 percentage points. We show that this finding is not explained by changes in maternal behavior or access to care. More likely, the policy rules led to income insecurity, escalating the inequalities that the policy aimed to address.

Room: Due to the current situation regarding the COVID-19 pandemic, the talk will be held in a virtual seminar room. For more information click here.